IKZ Summer School 2018: 'Solid-state lasers', September 24 - 26, 2018

www Kopf

 
Monday, September 24 - Wednesday, September 26, 2018

Venue: Leibniz-Institute for Crystal Growth, Berlin, Germany
Lecturer: Prof. Dr. Günter Huber, Universität Hamburg, Institut für Laserphysik

 

 

About the Summer School

summerschool inhalt 1The course reviews the basic concepts of advanced highly efficient rare earth ion doped solid-state lasers based on 4f-4f transitions of laser ions such as Yb3+, Tm3+, Er3+, Pr3+, and Tb3+ which have opened new prospects for laser applications at various wavelengths and power regimes. The main emphasis is placed on the interplay between materials aspects and most relevant spectroscopic as well as laser related properties in the search for new solid-state laser systems.
(Left figure:Pumping scheme of a thin disk laser for high power laser operation of Yb3+:Lu2O3)

 

For the near infrared spectral region Yb3+-doped laser crystals feature very high efficiencies and reduced heat generation due to small Stokes-losses between pump and laser photons. In particular, Yb3+:Lu2O3 possesses high thermal conductivity and has been operated at record slope efficiencies of 80% in continuous wave operation and at more than 100 W of average power in the mode-locked sub-ps operation regime. Laser diode pumped, highly efficient 2-µm Tm3+- and 3-µm Er3+-lasers with special interest for medical applications are based on interionic interactions of Tm3+ and Er3+ laser ions, respectively.

 

Breakthroughs regarding efficient visible coherent light generation have been achieved with Pr3+- and Tb3+-lasers operating in the green, orange, and red spectral region under blue semiconductor laser pumping. Here both, the development of blue semiconductor pump lasers and the use of suitable short wavelength hosts with minimized excited state absorption of the laser ions contributed to major achievements.

 

Based on 4f-5d transitions, the ion Ce3+ exhibits broad, tunable transitions in the ultraviolet spectral region. In contrast to the well shielded inner 4f- levels of rare earth ions, the outer 5d-orpitals are not shielded resulting in a strong electron-phonon coupling of 5d-electrons - a situation which is similar to transition metal ion doped laser crystals like Ti-Sapphire.

 

summerschool inhalt 2The course will cover the following areas in detail:

  • Basic laser aspects
  • Growth and properties of laser crystals
  • Spectroscopic properties of rare earth ion doped laser materials
  • Laser parameters and related properties of rare earth ions
  • Visible and near infrared rare earth ion solid-state lasers
  • Broadly tunable lasers

(Right figure: Energy levels and excitation scheme of Tm3+ for 2 µm lasing)

How to register for the Summer School

  • This Summer School is addressed to employees of the Leibniz Insitute for Crystal Growth, but also students and PhDs from external institutes are welcome. If you are interested in attending this year's Summer School please send an email to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. with details of your institution and position (e.g. student bachelor / master / specialisation, PhD, scientist...). As space is limited the number of attendees is limited to 60.
  • The Summer School is free of charge, but all travel and accommodation cost must be solely borne by the participants.

    Registration deadline: September 10th, 2018

Schedule Summer School

  • Monday, September 24, 2018, 3 pm - 4:30 pm:
    Basic laser aspects
  • Tuesday, September 25, 2018, 11 am - 12:30 pm:
    Rare earth ion doped laser crystals
  • Tuesday, September 25, 2018, 3 pm - 4:30 pm:
    Lasers in the near infrared spectral region
  • Wednesday, September 26, 2018, 11 am - 12:30 pm:
    Lasers in the visible spectral region

CV Lecturer Guenter Huber

Portrt Huber

Guenter Huber, born 1947 in Ludwigsburg/Germany, received his Ph.D. degree in physics from the University of Stuttgart/Germany in 1975. He was research staff member of the Max-Planck-Institute/Stuttgart/Germany and of the Institute of Applied Physics of Hamburg University. He became Professor of Physics at Hamburg University in 1982. In 1986/1987 he was guest Professor at Ginzton Lab., Stanford University, USA. At Hamburg University he served as Director of the newly established Institute of Laser Physics (1991), Vice Dean (2000), Dean of the Faculty of Physics (2003-2006), and board member of the University Council (2008-2016).

His research activities in experimental laser physics are focused on diode pumped solid-state lasers, the development and fundamental characterization of new laser materials based on transition metal and rare earth ions. He has published more than 300 original papers in his research field.

He is Fellow of OSA, EPS and received the Quantum Electronics-Optics Prize of EPS in 2003 and the Charles Hard Townes Award of OSA in 2013. Since 2016 he is Foreign Member of the Russian Academy of Sciences.

Contact

Registration: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

Scientific contact: Dr. Christian Kränkel

Leibniz-Institut für Kristallzüchtung (IKZ)
Max-Born-Str. 2
12489 Berlin
Telefon: +49-30-6392-3019
Fax: +49-30-6392-3003
Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

Organisational contact: Stefanie Grüber

Leibniz-Institut für Kristallzüchtung (IKZ)
Max-Born-Str. 2
12489 Berlin
Telefon: +49-30-6392-3263
Fax: +49-30-6392-3003
Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

IKZ Summer School 2016: 'Towards Understanding Crystal Growth on an Atomic Scale', October 12-14, 2016

Leibniz-Institute for Crystal Growth, Berlin, Germany

Wednesday, October 12 - Friday, October 14, 2016

Lecturer: Elias Vlieg, Radboud University, IMM, Nijmegen, The Netherlands

This Summer School is mainly addressed to employees of the Leibniz Insitute for Crystal Growth, but students and academics, interested in the topic are welcome. For further questions and registration please send an This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

return to homepage

About the Summer School

The growth of crystals, whether this is a large and highly-perfect silicon boule or powder-like material of an active pharmaceutical ingredient, always takes place at the interface with its growth medium and (nearly) always atom by atom (or molecule by molecule). A complete understanding of crystal growth, and a subsequent control of the crystal properties, therefore requires an atomic-scale knowledge of the processes and structure at the interface. This series of lectures describes attempts to understand several topics from this atomic-scale perspective.
The faceted nature of a crystal (like quartz) makes anyone curious about the origin of this shape and understanding and predicting the morphology (habit) of a crystal is, therefore, a very classic subject. Both old and new models for this will be discussed.
At the growth interface, both the crystal and the growth medium will typically have a structure that is different from the bulk. Assessing such interfaces, in particular when growing from a solution or melt, is quite difficult, but a combination of techniques like Atomic Force Microscopy, computer simulations, and X-ray diffraction, has yielded significant insights. A number of examples will be discussed, including the ordering of Ga at the GaN-Ga interface at high pressure and temperature as observed using high-energy X-rays from synchrotron radiation sources.
In many applications, one aims to grow highly perfect crystals. In the case of protein crystals, the perfection is needed to achieve a high resolution of the protein structure. Growth without convection has several advantages in this context and a number of routes to achieve convection-free growth will be discussed. The resulting slow growth leads to better crystals and to a reduced uptake of impurities. This thus also yields lessons for the growth of other types of crystals.
Nature is homochiral; for example, nearly all natural amino acids are left-handed. This not only raises the fundamental question of why nature made this particular choice but also has practical consequences for pharmaceutical ingredients because the left-handed version can have very different effects than the right-handed one. Crystallization is one route to obtain chirally pure material. In the last decade, a number of new and surprising routes have been found. In Viedma ripening, for example, grinding a slurry of left- and right-handed crystals lead to a complete conversion of all the solid material to single chirality. This process involves interesting growth routes in which growth appears to take place by the incorporation of small clusters

How to register for the Summer School

  • This Summer School is mainly addressed to employees of the Leibniz Insitute for Crystal Growth, but students and academics, interested in the topic are welcome. If you are interested in attending this year's Summer School please send an email to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. As space is limited the number of attendees is limited to 60.
  • The Summer School is free of charge, but all travel and accommodation cost must be solely borne by the participants.

Schedule Summer School

  • Wednesday, October 12, 2016,     10am - 12pm:  Morphology Prediction 
  • Wednesday, October 12, 2016,       2pm -  4pm:   Role of Surface and Interface Structure during Crystal Growth
  • Thursday, October 13, 2016,        10am - 12pm:   Growing Better Protein Crystals without Convection
  • Friday, October 14,2016,              10am - 12pm :  Crystallisation Routes to Single Chirality

CV Lecturer Elias Vlieg

Elias Vlieg is a professor of Solid State Chemistry at the Institute for Molecules and Materials (IMM) at Radboud University, Nijmegen, The Netherlands.  The research theme of his group is the fundamental understanding of crystal growth, for which a wide range of experimental, computational and theoretical methods are applied to a wide range of crystals. His current interests include chiral separation, additives, nucleation, polymorphism, self-assembly and the atomic-scale structure of solid-liquid interfaces. As head of the Applied Materials Science group, he is further involved in the practical applications of III-V semiconductors for thin film solar cells, including a role as CEO of a small spin-off company.

Elias Vlieg_Summer School

Contact

Prof. Matthias Bickermann

Leibniz Institute for Crystal Growth (IKZ)
Max-Born-Str. 2
12489 Berlin, Germany
phone +49-30-6392-3047
facsimile +49-30-6392-3003
email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

IKZ Summer School 2015: 'Defect Formation during Crystal Growth from Melt & Selected Epitaxial Processes'

Leibniz Institute for Crystal Growth, Berlin, Germany

July 13 - July 15, 2015

Lecturer: Prof. Dr. habil. Peter Rudolph, Crystal Technology Consulting, Schönefeld, Germany

return to homepage

Summary Summer School

This course provides an overview of important defect types, their origins and interactions during the bulk crystal growth from the melt and selected epitaxial processes. The equilibrium and nonequilibrium thermodynamics, kinetic and interaction principles are considered as driving forces of defect generation, incorporation and ensembling. Results of modeling and practical in situ control are presented. Strong emphasis is placed on semiconductor crystal growth since it is from this class of materials that most have been first learned, the resulting knowledge than having been applied to other classes of material.

The treatment starts with melt-structure considerations and zero-dimensional defect types, i.e. native and extrinsic point defects. Their generation and incorporation mechanisms are discussed. Micro- and macro-segregation phenomena - striations and the effect of constitutional supercooling - are added. Dislocations and their patterning are discussed next as a central course theme. The role of high-temperature dislocation dynamics for collective interactions, like cell structuring and bunching, is specified. Additionally, some features of epitaxial dislocation kinetics and engineering are illustrated. Next, the grain boundary formation mechanisms, such as dynamic polygonization and interface instabilities, are discussed. The interplay between facets, inhomogeneous dopant incorporations and twinning is shown. Finally, second phase precipitation and inclusion trapping are discussed. The importance of in situ stoichiometry control is underlined. Generally, selected measures of defect engineering are given at the end of each chapter.

Schedule

    • Monday,        July 13, 2015:    Overview, Melt Structure, and Point Defect Formation
    • Monday,        July 13, 2015:     Dislocation Background and Definitions
    • Tuesday,       July 14, 2015:     Dislocation Dynamics
    • Tuesday,       July 14, 2015:     Grain Boundaries, Faceting, and Twinning
    • Wednesday,  July 15, 2015:      Second-Phase Particles

CV Lecturer Peter Rudolph

Prof. Peter Rudolph was born on July 1st, 1945 in Gera (Germany). After high-school graduation 1964 in Berlin and subsequent study at Technical University of Lviv (Ukraine), he received the Diploma in Electronic Technology in 1969. His  PhD (Dr. Engineer) of Solid State Physics and Technology he obtained at the same university in 1972. From 1973 to 1993 he was employed at the Institute of Crystallography and Material Science at Humboldt University in Berlin. In 1978 he prepared μg-crystal growth experiments for the first German manned space flight. In 1979 he obtained the Dsc (Dr. habil) of Crystallography at the Humboldt University. Here, in 1980 he became the head of the Laboratory of bulk Crystal Growth and in 1985 the university professor position. From 1991 to 1993 he was a member of the expert group of the ESA on μg-melt growth experiments. From 1993 to 1994 and in 1998 he held guest professorships at the Institute for Material Research of the Tohoku University in Sendai (Japan). During these times he also collaborated with numerous Japanese companies. Then, from 1994 to 2011 he was employed at the Leibniz Institute for Crystal Growth (IKZ) in Berlin. After his retirement in 2011, he is still related active as crystal technology consultant (CTC) for research and industry.
He published about 300 original papers, reviews, book contributions, and is a co-author of 35 patents. Recently he edited the 2-nd volume of Elsevier's Handbook of Crystal Growth. He held diverse guest lecture courses in more than 15 countries around the world. He acted also as a lecturer of several International Schools on Crystal Growth of the IUCr and IOCG. Peter Rudolph has held various functions in the VfK (secretary), DGKK (president, head of working group), IUCr and IOCG (executive committee). In 2001 and 2008 his former teams won the Innovation Award Berlin-Brandenburg.

contact

Prof. Matthias Bickermann

Leibniz Institute for Cystal Growth (IKZ)
Max-Born-Str. 2, 12489 Berlin, Germany
phone +49-30-6392-3047
facsimile +49-30-6392-3003
email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

IKZ Summer School 2013: '(Punkt-) Defekte in Kristallen'

Leibniz-Institut für Kristallzüchtung, Berlin, Deutschland

07. Oktober - 09. Oktober 2013

Gastdozent: Prof. Dr. Jörg Weber, Technische Universität Dresden

zurück zur Startseite

Inhalt der Summer School

Die dramatischen Fortschritte in der Mikroelektronik und der Photovoltaik wären undenkbar ohne ausgefeilte Techniken zur Bestimmung und Charakterisierung von Punktdefekten. Anspruchsvolle spektroskopische wie auch theoretische Methoden mußten entwickelt werden, um die Natur dieser Abweichungen von der idealen Kristallstruktur zu verstehen.
In fünf Vorträgen werden die grundlegenden Eigenschaften von Dotierstoffen und Defekten kurz diskutiert und ein Überblick über die jüngsten Entwicklungen in der Defektidentifizierung und -charakterisierung gegeben. Dazu werden repräsentative Beispiele von verschiedenen Halbleitern vorgestellt.

Zeitplan

    • Montag,   07.10.2013,     10:00 - 12:00 Uhr:  Einführung in den Defekt-Zoo
    • Montag,   07.10.2013,     14:00 - 16:00 Uhr: 'Flache' Defekte: Dotierstoffe
    • Dienstag, 08.10.2013,     10:00 - 12:00 Uhr: 'Tiefe' Defekte: Übergangsmetalle
    • Dienstag, 08.10.2013,     14:00 - 16:00 Uhr:  Der 'einfachste' Defekt: Wasserstoff
    • Mittwoch, 09.10.2013,    10:00 - 12:00 Uhr: Wichtige Defekte: Noch unbekannt!

CV Gastdozent Jörg Weber

Prof. Jörg Weber ist seit Dezember 1999 Lehrstuhlinhaber für Halbleiterphysik an der TU Dresden. Er untersucht Verunreinigungen und Defekte in verschiedenen Halbleitern. Aktuell erforscht er Wasserstoff in verschiedenen Materialumgebungen und deßen Relevanz in der Bauelementtechnologie.
Prof. Jörg Weber war Dekan und Vizerektor, Co-Editor mehrerer Sonderausgaben von 'Applied Physics' und leitete verschiedene Tagungen/Symposien. Seit 1984 organisiert er die jährlichen 'Punktdefekttreffen'.

Kontakt

Prof. Matthias Bickermann

Leibniz-Institut für Kristallzüchtung (IKZ)
Max-Born-Str. 2, 12489 Berlin, Germany
Telefon +49-30-6392-3047
Fax +49-30-6392-3003
Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

IKZ Summer School 2012 : 'Crystal Growth - from Fundamentals to Technology'

Leibniz Institute for Crystal Growth, Berlin, Germany

June 5 -  June 7, 2012

Lecturer: Prof. Dr. Dr. h.c. Georg Müller, Crystal Consulting, Langensendelbach (formerly University of  Erlangen-Nürnberg)

return to homepage

CV Lecturer Georg Müller

Georg Müller received his PhD in Physics from the University of Erlangen-Nuremberg in 1974. He was a professor of materials science at the University of Erlangen-Nuremberg from 1988 to 2007. There he founded the Crystal Growth Laboratory (CGL) in 1980 and was head of the Department of Crystal Growth at Fraunhofer Institute IISB in Erlangen from 1999 to 2004.
Amongst other awards, he received  the Laudise Prize of the International Organisation of Crystal Growth, which is the highest international award in the field of applied crystal growth in 2002 , the 'Wissenschaftspreis des Deutschen Stifterverbandes'in 2003, and the 'Preis für gute Lehre" (award for outstanding lecturing) of the Bavarian State Ministry for Science, Research and Arts in 2006.
Georg Müller has made important contributions to the research and development of bulk crystal growth during the last 30 years. Examples of his contributions include the understanding of convective processes during melt growth, the development of the vertical gradient freeze (VGF) technique and the development of user-friendly software (e.g. CrysVUN) to simulate melt growth processes.

contact

Leibniz Institute for Crystal Growth (IKZ)

Max-Born-Str. 2, 12489 Berlin, Germany
phone +49-30-6392-3047
facsimile +49-30-6392-3003
email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

IKZ Summer School 2010: 'Chemical & Thermodynamic Issues of Crystal Growth'

Leibniz Institute for Crystal Growth, Berlin, Germany

May 31 - June 4, 2010

Lecturer: Prof. Dr. Thomas F. Kuech, University of Wisconsin - Madison (USA)

zurück zur Startseite

Schedule

    • Monday,       May 31, 2010      
    • Tuesday,       June 1, 2010     
    • Wednesday,  June 2, 2010   
    • Thursday,     June 3, 2010   
    • Friday,          June 4, 2010

CV Lecturer Thomas F. Kuech

Thomas F. Kuech received both a M.S. and Ph.D. in Applied Physics from the California Institute of Technology. He was a Research Staff Member at the IBM T.J. Watson Research Center until 1990 and a research manager. He has been a member of the faculty of the Chemical and Biological Engineering Department at the University of Wisconsin at Madison since 1990 and he currently is the Shoemaker Professor of Chemical Engineering and the UW-Beckwith Chaired Professor. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and a Fellow of the American Physical Society and the IEEE with more than 450 refereed publications. He has received several honors including a Humboldt Research Award, several named lectureships, the American Institute of Chemical Engineering Stine Award, and is a concurrent professor of Nanjing University in the department of Physics.

His fields of interest comprise:

- solid-state materials synthesis and characterization
- electronic and semiconductor materials
- materials integration
- nanostructure formation

contact

Leibniz Institute for Crystal Growth (IKZ)

Max-Born-Str. 2, 12489 Berlin, Germany
phone +49-30-6392-3047
facsimile +49-30-6392-3003
email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

IKZ Summer School 2009: 'Heat and Mass Transfer in Crystal Growth'

Leibniz Institute for Crystal Growth, Berlin, Germany

June 8 - June 12, 2009

Lecturer: Prof. A. G. Ostrogorsky, Illinois Institute of Technology (USA)

return to homepage

Schedule

    • Monday,       June 8, 2009:    1-D Approach to Solute Segregation
    • Tuesday,      June 9, 2009:    Convection. BL Theory (2-D)s
    • Wednesday, June 10, 2009,   Integral Methods. Segregation
    • Thursday,    June 11, 2009,   Natural Convection and Turbulence
    • Friday,        June 12, 2009,   Radiation Heat Transfer. Measurement of the Absorption Coefficient.

CV Lecturer A. G. Ostrogorsky

A. Ostrogorsky received his Dipl. Ing. degree in Mechanical Engineering at the University of Belgrade (1977), Masters degree in Nuclear Engineering at R.P.I. (1981), and Sc.D. in Mechanical Engineering at MIT (1986). He worked as a Post-doctoral associate, in the Material Science and Engineering Dept. at M.I.T. until 1987, when he joined Columbia University as an Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering. In 1991, he was an Alexander von Humboldt Fellow at the Material Science Department Universität Erlanger-Nürnberg. He joined the Rensselaer faculty in January 1993. He was Director of the Center for Microgravity and Materials Research (CMMR) at the Univ. of Alabama in Huntsville, January 1999- to Sept.2000. In 2002, Dr. Ostrogorsky was Principal Investigator of the NASA-sponsored SUBSA investigation, conducted at the International Space Station (ISS) ALPHA. Dr. Ostrogorsky holds a joint appointment with the Department of Materials Science & Engineering. He is Fellow of ASME, Member of the Executive Committee of AACG, Associate fellow of AIAA and Member of the Asia Institute of Nano-Biotechnology, Pusan, Korea.

contact

Leibniz Institute for Crystal Growth (IKZ)
Max-Born-Str. 2, 12489 Berlin, Germany
phone +49-30-6392-3047
facsimile +49-30-6392-3003
email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

IKZ Summer School 2008: 'Elementary Mechanisms of Crystal Growth & Their Theoretical Understanding - Taking Semiconductor as a Model Material'

Leibniz Institute for Crystal Growth, Berlin, Germany

Juni 16 - Juni 20, 2008

Lecturer: Prof. Tatau Nishinaga, Toyohashi University of Technology, Aichi, Japan

return to homepage

Summary Summer School

The  Summer School on Crystal Growth took place in June 2008 for the third time, thus slowly becoming a highly appreciated tradition. Following Jeff Derby in 2006 and Alex Chernov in 2007 again one of the most prominent scientists in our field could be attracted as this year’s lecturer: Tatau Nishinaga, Professor emeritus of the University of Tokyo who was staying as a scientist in residence at our Institute during that time. The general title of Nishinaga’s series of lectures was 'Elementary Mechanisms of Crystal Growth and their Theoretical Understanding – Taking Semiconductors as a Model Material'. Although the IKZ is not focusing on its research activities on molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) it is an excellent tool for in situ observation of elementary crystal growth processes and its results can largely be transferred to any crystal growth process. Tatau Nishinaga presentation was largely based on insights gained from MBE of various III-V compound semiconductors.

Zeitplan

    • Monday,        June 16, 2008:    Molecular Beam Epitaxy (MBE) as a Tool for Understanding the Elementary Growth Processes
    • Tuesday,       June 17, 2008,     Morphological Stability of Surfaces and Interfaces
    • Wednesday,   June 18,2008,     Growth Induced Impurity Inhomogeneities and Their Origins
    • Thursday,      June 19, 2008:    Reduction of Dislocation Density by Microchannel Epitaxy (MCE)
    • Friday,          June 20, 2008:     Fabrication of Microstructures by Crystal Growth

CV Tatau Nishinaga

Prof. Tatau Nishinaga is the fifth president of Toyohashi University of Technology, in Aichi, Japan. He received his Ph.D. in electrical engineering from Nagoya University in 1967. He was appointed professor at the engineering faculty at Toyohashi University of Technology in 1977, the engineering faculty at Nagoya University in 1980, the engineering faculty at the University of Tokyo in 1983, and the engineering and science faculty at  Meijo University in 2000. In April 2002, he was appointed president of Toyohashi University of Technology. He is a member of the American Association for Crystal Growth.

contact

Leibniz Institute for Crystal Growth (IKZ)
Max-Born-Str. 2, 12489 Berlin, Germany
phone +49-30-6392-3047
facsimile +49-30-6392-3003
email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

IKZ Summer School 2007: 'Physics of Crystal Growth'

Leibniz Institue for Crystal Growth, Berlin, Germany

June 4 - Juni 8, 2007

Lecturer: Prof. A. A. Chernov, President, International Organization for Crystal Growth (IOCG)

return to homepage

Schedule

    • Monday,        June 4, 2007:     Surface at Equilibrium
    • Tuesday,       June 5, 2007:     Nucleation and Epitaxy
    • Wednesday,   June 6, 2007:    Kinetics at Surfaces
    • Thursday,      June 7, 2007:     Transport and Stability
    • Friday,          June 8, 2007 :     Impurities and Defects

CV Lecturer A. A. Chernov

A. A. Chernov became a Professor of Physics in 1970. IN 1987, he was elected a Member if the USSR (In 1992, renamed the Russian) Academy of Sciences, Department of General Physics and Astronomy. His career consists of time with the Institute of Crystallography at the Russian Academy of Sciences in Moscow as a Technician, Junior Scientist, Senior Scientist, Head of the Elementary Processes of Crystal Growth Laboratory and the Crystallization and the Crystal Perfection Physics Department. Since 1996 he has held the positions of Program Director with the Universities Space Research Laboratory at NASA Mashall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, AL, USA. Prof. Chernov was awarded the first IOCG Frank Prize in Sendai, Japan in 1989.

contact

Leibniz Institute for Cystal Growth (IKZ)
Max-Born-Str. 2, 12489 Berlin, Germany
phone +49-30-6392-3047
facsimile +49-30-6392-3003
email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Partnerlogo 1 EN

Partnerlogo 2

Partnerlogo 3